Why Chocolate is Good for Tallulah and My Heart

Tallulah Pacehead

Eating chocolate has been tied to a reduced risk of heart disease. Now scientists have uncovered how strong this link is.

“Using data from a large Danish health study, researchers have found an association between chocolate consumption and a lowered risk for atrial fibrillation, the irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and other serious problems. The study is in Heart.”

“Scientists tracked diet and health in 55,502 men and women ages 50 to 64. They used a well-validated 192-item food-frequency questionnaire to determine chocolate consumption. During an average 14 years of follow-up, there were 3,346 diagnosed cases of atrial fibrillation.”

“After controlling for total calorie intake, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index and other factors, they found that compared with people who ate no chocolate, those who had one to three one-ounce servings a month had a 10 percent reduced relative risk for atrial fibrillation, those who ate one serving a week had a 17 percent reduced risk, and those who ate two to six a week had a 20 percent reduced risk.”

“Dark chocolate with higher cocoa content is better, according to the lead author, Elizabeth Mostofsky, an instructor at Harvard, because it is the cocoa, not the milk and sugar, that provides the benefit.”

“You can’t have as much chocolate as you want,” she said, “and then ignore everything we know about healthy diet and physical activity.”

Ms. Mostofsky is a bit of a spoil sport.  But I’m going for a 20% reduced risk so Tallulah Pacehead can chill.

Check these out too!  Just click:

Woofer’s Chocolate Raspberry Bark Bark

Freddie’s Food Friday

A Chocolate a Day Melts the Fat Away

Chocolate Rides Again

(jw)

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The Everyday Habits that Reveal our Personality

The results are surprising. Example: If you’re a prolific curser, you can now defend your habit as a sign of your open-mindedness . . .

1. Greater conscientiousness was distinguished by:

  • avoidance of various activities, including such innocuous pastimes as reading  (speculated that it may be seen by the highly conscientious as a leisure-time luxury),
  • swearing 
  • chewing on a pencil.

Agreeably Ironing Things Out by Peggy

2. People scoring high on agreeability said they spent more time:

  • ironing,
  • playing with children 
  • washing the dishes – presumably because their strong motivation to keep other people happy means they’d rather do the chores than have domestic acrimony.
  • more likely to sing in the shower or the car.

3. Strongly open-minded people were more likely to read poetry, eat spicy breakfasts, and lounge around in the nude!

4. Neurotic people engaged more often in:

  • activities associated with helping reduce mental distress, such as taking more tranquilisers and anti-depressants. But they also admitted to more
  • anti-social behaviours, such as losing their temper more often,
  • or making fun of others – perhaps because they struggle to keep their own emotions in check.

    5. Extraverts are more likely to ink themselves with tattoos

    • wallow more in hot tubs
    • spent more time planning parties
    • drinking in bars
    • discussing ways to make money
    • talking on the phone while driving

    6. Open-mindedness went together with some obvious behaviors like:

    Open-minded by Peggy

  • reading poetry
  • going to the opera
  • smoking marijuana
  • producing art
  • swearing around others,
  • eating spicy food at breakfast
  • lounging around the house with no clothes on. (To be precise, the highest scorers said they were about twice as likely to have sat around in the nude for more than 15 times in the past year, compared to the lowest scorers.)
  • less likely to follow a sports team.

     Previous studies had shown that the highly conscientious are more likely to wear a watch, comb their hair and polish their shoes!

The serious side to this field of research is learning more about the harmful and unhealthy everyday behaviours linked to the different personality traits which then could contribute to better, more targeted health campaigns and interventions. 

*”The researchers, Benjamin Chapman at the University of Rochester and Lewis Goldberg at the Oregon Research Institute, profiled nearly 800 people in Oregon, USA, most of whom were white, and their average age was 51. The personality test asked participants to rate how accurately 100 different trait adjectives described their personalities, including words such as bashful, kind, neat, relaxed, moody, bright and artistic. The researchers then compared these personality test scores with the same participants’ answers, recorded four years later, to how often they had performed 400 different activities over the last year, from reading a book to singing in the shower.”

Here’s the entire article: Everyday Habits that Reveal our Personalities 

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