Insomniacs Often Struggle to Get Past Emotional Distress

“Insomniacs tend to have a hard time getting past embarrassing mistakes, even when the stressful event occurred decades ago, according to a new study by researchers at the Netherlands Institute for Neuroscience.”

“The scientists asked participants to relive their most shameful experiences from decades ago while observing their brain activity with an MRI scan. They found that while good sleepers had settled those experiences in their head as neutralized memories, those with insomnia had not been able to do so.”

“The finding suggests that failure to neutralize emotional distress could be a major contributor to insomnia and may also help explain why insomnia is the primary risk factor for the development of disorders of mood, anxiety, and posttraumatic stress.”*

“Researchers have established that sleep helps us to remember important experiences. But sleep is also necessary to get rid of the emotional distress that may have occurred during those experiences. Both these overnight processes involve changes in the connections between brain cells: some become stronger and consolidate memories, whereas others are weakened and get rid of unwanted associations.”

“Sayings like ‘sleeping on it’ to ‘get things off your mind’ reflect our nocturnal digestion of daytime experiences,” said doctoral student and first author Rick Wassing. “Brain research now shows that only good sleepers profit from sleep when it comes to shedding emotional tension. The process does not work well in people with insomnia. In fact, their restless nights can even make them feel worse.”

“The new findings support a previous study conducted by the same research group. In this study, published in the journal Sleep, the researchers asked participants to sing along to a song karaoke-style. Headphones prevented participants from hearing their own voice and finding the correct pitch. Their singing was recorded and played back for them later.”

“Many participants felt intense shame when listening to their own out-of-tune solo singing. But when good sleepers listened to their own singing again after getting a good night’s sleep, they didn’t feel that distressed about it anymore. They had released the distress from their minds. However, after a restless night, people with insomnia became even more upset about their embarrassing experience.”

“The new findings suggest that insomnia triggers may actually be found in brain circuits that regulate emotions, rather than in brain regions that regulate sleep, as previously believed. These emotion-regulating circuits contain risk genes for insomnia and may not activate properly, as they normally do, during rapid eye movement sleep.”

“Without the benefits of sound sleep, distressing events of decades ago continue to activate the emotional circuits of the brain as if they are happening right now. This suggests that people with insomnia may continue to be haunted by memories of past distress.”

*The findings are published in the scientific journal Brain.

https://psychcentral.com/news/2019/04/28/insomniacs-often-struggle-to-get-past-emotional-distress/144935.html

Frankly Freddie, Your Dog Can Help You Get A Better Night’s Sleep (parenthetically speaking)

Dear Human-beings, my faithful fans,

Some human-beings have a bit too much time on their hands, coming up with stupid studies to prove the obvious.  Here’s my evidence:

“According to the American Veterinary Association, currently, over 40 million American households have dogs. Among these households, 63 percent consider their pet dogs as a part of their family. (The other 37 percent are cat owners) However, many of them still are divided when it comes to having their furry family members sleep with them in the bedroom.”

“But, there’s a solution to the problem in a new study published this month, which said that having canine companions could actually improve the quality of your sleep. (Quality of sleep!? . . . we improve the quality of your LIFE) Although, there’s a catch. Letting them sleep in your bedroom is ok, but it doesn’t hold true if your dog is in the bed with you.”

A Mayo Clinic study, titled “The Effect of Dogs on Human Sleep in the Home Sleep Environment,” published in the September issue of Mayo Clinic Proceedings  . . . , suggested that people might actually sleep better when their dogs are in the bedroom with them, meaning that shooing your furry friends off might not be such a good idea. (They needed a study to discover it’s not nice to “shoo”?)

The study was based on an examination of 40 people who owned dogs and didn’t suffer from any sleep disorders over the course of five months. They put accelerometers on both the dogs and the owners for seven nights for the study and then determined the results.  (Accelerometers?! – no wonder no one could sleep) https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Accelerometer

The study found that people had a greater sense of comfort and security when they allowed their dogs to sleep in the bedroom. The study also differentiated between the dog being on the bed or just simply in the bedroom. It found that owners with dogs on their beds suffered from lower sleep quality than normal.  (What the study didn’t say is that we Canine-dogs suffer from lower sleep quality than normal when humans are on the bed.  Humans kick and turn, hog the covers,  groan and snore. Their accelerometer is off the charts)  

The researchers also said that it is important to consider the limited sample size on which the study was conducted and also to note that none of the dogs examined were under six months old. Younger puppies have more energy and thus might be problematic if they let into the bedroom at night. Thus, further research is required to understand the association between letting your dog sleep in the bedroom or not.

(Further research is NOT needed.  All you need to do is ask your dog)

Frankly,

Freddie Parker Westerfield, SSCD

Sound Sleeping Canine Dog

http://www.ibtimes.com/your-dog-can-help-you-get-better-nights-sleep-study-2588111

How to fall asleep – Cool It!

Bodies cool down while we prepare to nod off. Our blood vessels expand, allowing heat to escape our bodies quicker. Body temperatures, which fluctuate by about 1 degree over the course of 24 hours, will bottom out in the wee hours of the morning.

People tend to sleep best in colder rooms, between 60 and 67 degrees

dscn6782

Sleepy, from Maui’s Story by Peggy

Sleep researchers know that right before you fall asleep, your body temperature starts to drop; in the deepest stages of sleep, your body is at its coolest, about one or two degrees below normal. Some scientists believe cooler temperatures cause sleepiness, and although the pre-slumber cooling process happens naturally, there are a few things you can do to help it along:

  • Take a warm bath right before bed.  When you leave the tub, your body temperature rapidly cools, triggering that sleepy feeling.

  • Drink a warm beverage – works the same way as a warm bath.

  • Turn on a fan.

  • Stick your foot out of the covers.

But why the foot, specifically? The skin surfaces of both our hands and feet are unique – they’re hairless and contain specialized vascular structures that help with heat loss. Specifically, the hands and feet contain blood vessels called the arteriovenous anastomoses, which — coupled with the lack of hair on the bottoms of your feet — are perfectly designed to help dissipate body heat.

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

SaveSave

%d bloggers like this: