BRAINJACKING

I’m electronically vulnerable . . . gulp . . . and I’m not talking about my

cell phone, or computer.  I have a pacemaker (who I’ve written about many times)

Tallulah PaceHead, my Cranky Pacemaker

and a home monitoring device which sits on my bedroom dresser and electronically sends information to my doctor who can immediately see how my heart is beating . . .  or not.  

 judy’s Pacemaker, Tallulah Pacehead

After reading this news synopsis I have vowed to be more loving to my friends and VERY solicitous of  my enemies.  Anyone with a bit of malice could hijack* Tallulah.

“Medical implants with wireless functionality are becoming increasingly common. They can be programmed, controlled and recharged without the need for surgery or wires.”

“Now cybersecurity experts have warned that medical device hacking could take an even more disturbing twist as patients begin to receive implants in their brains. Known as Deep Brain Stimulation, these devices deliver electrical pulses to neurons in the brain on or off. They are already being used to treat conditions such as Parkinson’s Disease, but are being trialed in patients suffering from Tourettes Syndrome, chronic pain, depression, anorexia, mood disorders, and obsessive compulsive disorder.”

“Researchers at the University of Oxford warn wireless programming used to control these brain implants could be hijacked by hackers to induce pain, tremors or even alter their behavior.”

“While more convenient, these wireless medical devices are also far more vulnerable to hacking.

*Former US Vice President Dick Cheney had the wireless function on his pacemaker turned off in case foreign powers tried to use it to assassinate him.”

Ay iiiii iiiiiiiii, I’m in BIG trouble.  I’m a Democrat

Why Chocolate is Good for Tallulah and My Heart

Tallulah Pacehead

Eating chocolate has been tied to a reduced risk of heart disease. Now scientists have uncovered how strong this link is.

“Using data from a large Danish health study, researchers have found an association between chocolate consumption and a lowered risk for atrial fibrillation, the irregular heartbeat that can lead to stroke, heart failure and other serious problems. The study is in Heart.”

“Scientists tracked diet and health in 55,502 men and women ages 50 to 64. They used a well-validated 192-item food-frequency questionnaire to determine chocolate consumption. During an average 14 years of follow-up, there were 3,346 diagnosed cases of atrial fibrillation.”

“After controlling for total calorie intake, smoking, alcohol consumption, body mass index and other factors, they found that compared with people who ate no chocolate, those who had one to three one-ounce servings a month had a 10 percent reduced relative risk for atrial fibrillation, those who ate one serving a week had a 17 percent reduced risk, and those who ate two to six a week had a 20 percent reduced risk.”

“Dark chocolate with higher cocoa content is better, according to the lead author, Elizabeth Mostofsky, an instructor at Harvard, because it is the cocoa, not the milk and sugar, that provides the benefit.”

“You can’t have as much chocolate as you want,” she said, “and then ignore everything we know about healthy diet and physical activity.”

Ms. Mostofsky is a bit of a spoil sport.  But I’m going for a 20% reduced risk so Tallulah Pacehead can chill.

Check these out too!  Just click:

Woofer’s Chocolate Raspberry Bark Bark

Freddie’s Food Friday

A Chocolate a Day Melts the Fat Away

Chocolate Rides Again

(jw)

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