Why Stand-up Comedians Live Longer than Sit-com writers. Why Lap-dancers die sooner than Pole-dancers.

If you are sitting down while reading this, STAND UP RIGHT NOW!  

My favorite heart health blog, My Heart Sisters has a great post.  Here’s a tidbit: 

“The Australian study on prolonged sitting adjusted for other factors such as age, weight, physical activity and general health status, all of which can also affect longterm health risks. It found a clear dose-response effect:the more people sat, the higher their risk of premature death.

Stand up is better

Healthy or sick, active or inactive, the more people sat, the more likely they were to die prematurely compared to those with non-sedentary lives. While the death risk was lower for anyone who exercised five hours a week or more, it still rose as these active people sat longer.

Why is prolonged sitting so comparatively hard on human beings? This study’s researchers concluded:

“The adverse effects of prolonged sitting are thought to be mainly owing to reduced metabolic and vascular health. Prolonged sitting has been shown to disrupt metabolic function. Sedentary behavior affects carbohydrate metabolism through changes in muscle glucose transporter protein content.

Pole cat

“Our findings suggested not only an association between sitting and all-cause mortality that was independent of physical activity but, because the findings persisted after adjustment and stratification for Body Mass Index, one that also appears to be independent of BMI.”

In another Australian study reported in the journal Diabetes Care, scientists at the Baker IDI Heart and Diabetes Institute in Melbourne observed adults who sat for seven hours on some days and who rose every 20 minutes and walked leisurely on a treadmill for two minutes on other days. When the volunteers remained stationary for the full seven hours, their blood sugar spiked and insulin levels were erratic. But when they broke up the hours with movement, even that short two-minute stroll, their blood sugar levels remained stable. The scientists concluded that what was important was simply breaking up those long, interminable hours of sitting.”

I wonder if lying down with my feet pressed against the wall would work? 

Read more here: http://myheartsisters.org/2012/04/29/sitting-down/

Originally posted on Curious to the Max  Click here for more from Curious to the Max

Tooth-Heart Connection . . . who knew?

Over the years we’ve re-posted from Carolyn Thomas’ blog Heart Sisters because they are always informative, well-researched and well written.  Her latest post on unusual pain that shows up in the mouth, jaw or face – what dentists call “orofacial pain” – can be a cardiac warning sign really caught my attention.  Here’s a few highlight but I recommend you reading the entire post and click here:

 https://myheartsisters.org/2018/04/01/dentist-diagnosing-cardiac-symptoms/

“Orofacial pain of cardiac origin is typically a toothache that occurs spontaneously, and is usually made worse with exercise (just as the chest pain of stable angina typically comes on with exertion, and eases up with rest).”

“Unlike a conventional toothache caused by dental issues, the tooth or jaw pain that’s linked to heart issues can decrease when the coronary vasodilator called nitroglycerin is taken, and can also occur at the same time along with chest, neck, shoulder or throat pain.”

“Researchers in Barcelona, for example, found that orofacial pain that’s actually heart-related – unlike toothache pain – you may feel the pain on both sides of the face. The lead author of the study explained that orofacial pain of cardiac origin is considered to be atypical, but present in up to 10% of all people during a heart attack, with or without chest pain.”
  • “When these orofacial pain of cardiac origin occur, unnecessary dental treatment is often performed
  • “There are published clinical cases of patients who have undergone unnecessary dental extractions or have been prescribed pain medications due to misdiagnosis, without curing the orofacial pain.
  • This leads to a delay in a cardiac diagnosis, and consequently, a delay in beginning necessary treatment.”

Looking into “Cavities” by Peggy

The signs suggesting that a toothache may be more than just a simple toothache include:

  • a burning or pulsing pain
  • a pain that goes into remission, or dramatically changes
  • a persistent pain during days or months
  • a spontaneous pain in multiple teeth
  • a pain that does not go into remission even after anaesthetic block (freezing)
  • lack of response to adequate dental treatment

Open wide! Cardiac symptoms diagnosed in the dental chair

Carolyn wrote more about both atypical cardiac symptoms and many other typical symptoms in Chapter 1 of her book, “A Woman’s Guide to Living with Heart Disease” (Johns Hopkins University Press, November 2017)

 

 

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