Procrastination Style, Part III – Solutions

If you haven’t already . . .Take the quiz, Part I

Read the post, Part II –  My Inner Conflicts to see what YOUR Inner Conflicts are so you can solve them.

Beat Procrastination and Make the Grade: The Six Styles of Procrastination and How Students Can Overcome Them

by Linda Sapadin

“1) The Perfectionist: You’re overly concerned with not meeting high expectations; you work so hard you never finish (or, sometimes, never start).”

Alphabetize cans by Peggy

“Solutions: Appreciate that it’s your perfectionism, not external standards that make you do what you do. Set realistic (not idealistic) goals before starting. Focus on progress toward your goals. Engage in positive self-talk. Set time limits for each task. Learn to make mistakes—really—do so deliberately and see what happens!”

“2) The Dreamer: You’re great at planning and scheming but frustrated by the practical reality of sitting down to do hard work”.

“Solutions: Try turning some of your dreams into concrete goals and spend time on them regularly. Figure out how academic success can make you feel good about yourself (pleasure doesn’t only come from external sources). You’re not exceptional— the same standards and expectations apply to you. Don’t wait for the spirit to move you; learn to harness your energy.”

“3) The Worrier: “What ifs” get in the way. You avoid making decisions, resist change, and are fearful about the unfamiliar.”

“Solutions: Remember that not to decide is to decide; delaying decisions changes the course of your life. Turn nerves into excitement. Don’t “catastrophize”—not everything has to feel overwhelming. Believe in yourself—it’ll make you less fragile. Commit, then figure out how to accomplish something. Don’t let qualifiers and negative statements creep into your thinking. Answer your “what ifs” with a plan. Break bigger projects into pieces. Hang out with optimists.”

“4) The Crisis-Maker: You enjoy the last-minute adrenaline rush and tell yourself you work best under pressure.”

“Solutions: Think about multiple reasons to do an assignment (instead of only last-minute stress). Recognize that you don’t know if you’ll enjoy an assignment until you start it. You’re not a victim; see tasks as opportunities. Remember the positive aspects of your responsibilities. Reward yourself for getting started earlier. Get your adrenaline going with other activities.”

“5) The Defier: You rebel against external deadlines and expectations. You might be overt about this, or you might exhibit a more passive-aggressive kind of defiance.”

“Solutions: Take responsibility for where you are and the choices that got you there. Negotiate when possible—you just might get your way. Choose your battles and consider the consequences. Remember the relationship between short and long-term choices. Set aside time to do the things you enjoy. Channel your rebellious side into a cause you care about.”

“6) The Overdoer: There’s too much on your plate because you can’t say no or set appropriate boundaries. As a result, there’s never enough time to do it all.”

“Solutions: Remember that no one has it all; you have to prioritize and decide what to care about. Your academic success should come before making others happy. You’re in control—take control. Learn to say no. You’re entitled to relax and reward yourself; don’t feel guilty for doing so. Be more proactive than reactive. Ask for help!”

https://www.amazon.com/Its-About-Time-Procrastination-Overcome/dp/0140242716

Click to access 6%20kinds%20of%20procrastinators.pdf

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