Pausitively Tuesday: Drum Beats

“If a man does not keep pace with his companions, perhaps it is because he hears a different drummer. Let him step to the music which he hears, however measured or far away.”

Henry David Thoreau

Why some people are punctually-challenged

Research indicates that personality differences could dictate how we experience the passing of time.

Jeff Conte, a psychology professor at San Diego State University ran a study in which he separated participants into Type A people (ambitious, competitive) and Type B (creative, reflective, explorative). He asked them to judge, without clocks, how long it took for one minute to elapse.

  • Type A people felt a minute had gone by when roughly 58 seconds had passed.

  • Type B participants felt a minute had gone by after 77 seconds.

(Credit: Getty Images)Being consistently late might not be your fault. It could also be your type. The punctually-challenged often share personality characteristics such as:

  • optimism
  • low levels of self-control
  • anxiety
  • a penchant for thrill-seeking
  • People with anxiety diagnoses often avoid certain situations
  • Individuals with low self-esteem may take more time to check their work.
  • Depression often comes with low energy, making mustering the motivation to get a move on all the harder.
  •  Some persistent lateness comes from “an obsessive thinking problem.”*
  • Some can “crave” the neurochemical thrill of being rushed.

If you are chronically late, here are some tips for getting a handle on your timing from Gretchen Ruben.

  1. You sleep too late. If this is the case, try to slowly get to bed earlier (a few minutes earlier each day). Many people do not get enough sleep and this is not good for your health, your mood or being on time.
  2. You try to do “one more thing” before you leave. Gretchen recommends that you outsmart yourself by taking a task with you, that you can do after you reach your destination. Then leave early. If you do have time on the other end, you will accomplish that “one last thing”.
  3. You underestimate how much time getting something done will take. If it is routine, like a commute or taking a shower, time it so you know how long it takes. And be sure to time the whole thing. I (Peggy) once lived with someone who said it took 10 minutes for a shower—not counting how long it took to get into the shower or to dress afterwards, which took at lease another 10 minutes. If you know, you can plan accurately.
  4. You can’t find what you need in order to leave: keys, sunglasses, something you need to take with you. Set up a place for things you need-purse, keys, and where you can put what you need to leave with for a particular trip as well. Use that spot every time (and if your keys are there, you will need to go there). Gretchen uses a backpack, which can hold several things and is big enough to find easily.

Gretchen Rubin in Psychology Today

https://www.psychologytoday.com/us/blog/the-happiness-project/201602/always-late-9-tips-overcoming-chronic-lateness

Reference: Diana DeLonzor, author of Never Be Late Again.

*Dr Linda Sapadin, a psychologist and author of How to Beat Procrastination in the Digital Age

***Tim Urban, self-proclaimed late person and 2015 TED speaker.

Pawsitively Tuesday – Catitude from Dr. Seuss

“Don’t cry because it’s over,

be happy because it happened”

Dr. Seuss

Your Happiness Hack, Imagine Me

Daily exercise of imagining our best possible self for two weeks results in increases in optimism.

Imaging our best self can engage the parasympathetic nervous system – the function responsible for relaxation and slowing the heart rate – resulting in renewed optimism and improvements in working relationships. 

 

Richard Boyatzis, PhD, a professor at Case Western Reserve University, does research how people and organizations (from teams to communities) can make the changes they want and how they can sustain those changes.  He says:

 “There is strong neurological evidence supporting the theory that engaging our parasympathetic systems — through regular physical or leisure activities — stokes compassion and creativity.”

 

 

“Spaced-out” Learning

“What we know about how memories are made at a neuroscience level is that it’s not just important to repeat a stimulus, but it is important to leave spaces in between,” . . . “There are changes that happen to the genes and proteins on a neuron that help fix the memory if there are spaces between learning something.”

The latest neuroscience shows students who took part in spaced learning, where lessons are broken up by activities such as juggling, improved their attainment.

Training teachers to break up lessons with 10 minute “distractions”, such as juggling or model making, has been found to significantly boost pupils’ learning, early research has shown.

“A study involving 2,000 pupils revealed that information is more easily learnt if it is delivered in intense 12-minute bursts and broken up by 10 minute periods of an unrelated activity. The project, called SMART Spaces, is based on the latest neuroscience, which shows that information is better absorbed and more easily recalled when it is repeated a number of times, but spaced out with distractions.”

Whoops . . . wrong “space”

Spaced learning

“In Sheffield England technique as part of their revision lessons ahead of students’ GCSEs. Pupils had an intense 12 minute Power Point lesson in chemistry, then juggled for 10 minutes. After that they had 12 minutes of physics before another 10 minutes of juggling. The lesson was then finished with 12 minutes of biology. This was then repeated over two more days. Other schools broke up their lessons with plasticine model making and games of Simon Says. Mr Gittner said the study led to some significant gains in learning, and there are plans to implement a full-scale randomised controlled trial involving up to 50 schools.”

“The idea for the project came after Monkseaton High School in Newcastle made headlines in 2009 for teaching its pupils to pass a GCSE after just three days of learning. They were able to pass a sixth of a GCSE in just 60 minutes. Distractions boost results Mr Gittner said such approaches were not to counteract shrinking attention spans, adding that the techniques were backed up by the latest developments in neuroscience.

“It fits with the generally accepted views that people can only really focus for 20 minutes, even adults. Students that took part in our trial were able to concentrate fully because they new in 15 minutes they were going to get to to juggle,” 

https://inews.co.uk/essentials/news/education/juggling-lessons-boosts-learning/

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