A tenth of a second between me and Barbie

I’m standing in front of the open refrigerator, ready to get a snack. Even as my hand moves toward the food, my brain is still deciding what to do, still in the middle of choosing my hand passes the carrot sticks and grabs the chocolate cake.  Who knew?

If it weren’t for my chocolate lips I’d be a Barbie, Judy’s Journal page

  • “When we make a decision, we’re really choosing between several concrete plans of action and not abstract ideas.  Your brain is planning the necessary actions to execute all potential decisions. In fact, you’re still deciding when you move, and we can see that because of how you move.”
  • “How we move gives us a lot of clues into how people make decisions. For example, decisive choices tend to be a straight movement in one direction. But if we aren’t sure, the physical route we take might curve or hesitate. We can use that as an index of the preferences revealed in a movement as it is evolving.”
  • “Using this process, we can begin to identify which equations the brain uses to make these types of decisions. If we can identify these equations, we can develop targeted therapies and interventions for people who have disordered decision-making.” “If we understand exactly what is going wrong, we will be better able to intervene.  Compulsive gambling behaviour is an example of a disordered decision-making process that is impulsive, perseverative and ineffective.

My reaching for ice cream to go with the cake is adisordered decision-making process” . . .  I knew . . .

(jw)

Want to make better decisions? Slow down, Wispinki says:

“One way you can make better decisions is to wait a bit longer.” 

“That might be a way in which everyday decisions can be improved. It could be as little as a tenth of a second.”

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