Mindfulness Can Literally Change Your Brain

Perhaps you haven’t heard that the hype about mindfulness is backed by hard science? Recent research provides strong evidence that practicing non-judgmental, present-moment awareness (a.k.a. mindfulness) changes the brain.

 Your anterior cingulate cortex

“The first is the anterior cingulate cortex (ACC), a structure located deep inside your forehead, behind the brain’s frontal lobe. The ACC is associated with self-regulation, meaning the ability to purposefully direct attention and behavior, suppress inappropriate knee-jerk responses, and switch strategies flexibly.”

“People with damage to the ACC show impulsivity and unchecked aggression, and those with impaired connections between this and other brain regions perform poorly on tests of mental flexibility: they hold onto ineffective problem-solving strategies rather than adapting their behavior.”

Meditators, on the other hand, demonstrate superior performance on tests of self-regulation, resisting distractions and making correct answers more often than non-meditators. They also show more activity in the ACC than non-meditators. In addition to self-regulation, the ACC is associated with learning from past experience to support optimal decision-making. Scientists point out that the ACC may be particularly important in the face of uncertain and fast-changing conditions.”

Your hippocampus

“The hippocampus, a region that showed increased amounts of gray matter in the brains of a 2011 mindfulness program participants. This seahorse-shaped area is buried inside the temple on each side of the brain and is part of the limbic system, a set of inner structures associated with emotion and memory. It is covered in receptors for the stress hormone cortisol, and studies have shown that it can be damaged by chronic stress, contributing to a harmful spiral in the body. People with stress-related disorders like depresssion and PTSD tend to have a smaller hippocampus. All of this points to the importance of this brain area in resilience.”

Neuroscientists have also shown that practicing mindfulness affects brain areas related to

  • perception
  • body awareness
  • pain tolerance
  • emotion regulation
  • introspection
  • complex thinking
  • sense of self.

Mindfulness can be integrated into your religious or spiritual life, or practiced as a form of secular mental training.  When we take a seat, take a breath, and commit to being mindful, particularly when we gather with others who are doing the same, we have the potential to be changed.

(A team of scientists from the University of British Columbia and the Chemnitz University of Technology were able to pool data from more than 20 studies to determine which areas of the brain are consistently affected. They identified at least eight different regions.)

6 thoughts on “Mindfulness Can Literally Change Your Brain

  1. I’ve often thought I’d like to learn meditation and I often try to practice it at home. Now I understand why doing it as part of a group might be more effective. Tai Chi also appeals to me as it coordinates physical movement and mind focus. But overcoming inertia and my usual excuses about why I can’t/don’t do these things is my big problem.

    Like

    • Shari,
      I do a 10 -20 minute meditation after I say prayers in the morning. I sometimes miss the meditation part but coupling it with my prayers helps. I also just joined a weekly meditation group which has been helpful also.
      I believe that prayer is talking to God, meditation is listening . . . and God created both inertia of rest and inertia of motion . . .

      Liked by 1 person

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