Pawsitively Tuesday – Weighty Reflection

Reflection Direction:

1. Write spontaneously, VERY quickly, don’t analyze, everything (small or large) that “weighs” on you.

2. After completing your “Weight List” assign a number, based on how heavy you perceive each item:

1 = bicycle, 2 = motor cycle, 3 = car . 4= pick-up truck  5=jet airliner

3. Write down what YOU can LITERALLY control for each item on your list.

Frankly Freddie – Beware of evening stress like loud fireworks

Dear Freddie Fans,
As canines go I’m extremely laid back.  The only thing that stresses me are fireworks.  (If humans can send people into space they should be able to make fireworks that don’t make noise.) .  Humans, unlike me, seem to be stressed all the time but . . .

 . . . did you know

The human body releases lower levels of the hormone (that helps ease stress)

in the evening?

According to my research sources*: Cortisol levels — controlled by the circadian clock in the brain — increase significantly in the morning, but not in the evening.

Levels of the stress hormone cortisol in saliva were measured from 27 “. . .  young and healthy volunteers, who adhere to normal work hours and sleep habits,  The subjects were not obese and were in tiptop physical condition. Moreover, they did not have jobs in the early morning nor late night nor rotating night shifts, and they all had no personal history of psychiatric, endocrine, or sleep disorders” LIKE ME.

The study is probably too boring for you to read so I’ve distilled the essence for you:

When a stressful event activates the axis, the body releases cortisol.

Encountering stress later during the day or at night time can be harder on the body.*

Some of the important conclusions is the need to take time for your wellbeing, beginning with managing stress, particularly as the day is coming to a close. I have simple solutions for you to ease your stress in the evening and stop it from aggravating your health.

  • Don’t dwell on problems – humans who are too lazy to go for walks, not enough tasty treats, fireworks that contribute to mental anguish.
  • Get a pet LIKE ME.
  • Engage in a  hobby – play ball,   
  • Take “alone” time – you can scratch yourself.
  • Eat human superfoods like spinach & turkey, food high in tryptophan that contains an amino acid that boosts serotonin production that aids in alleviating stress.
  • Still your mind with positive thoughts 
  • Try mind-calming (HUMAN) activities: yogo, meditation, journaling
  • Surround yourself with positive people – like P&J

I had to learn basic Japanese words (“Time to eat”, “Let’s walk”, “Give me a treat”, “Please”, “Thank you”) to bring this information to you.*

たすけになれて)よかった。

I’m happy (to be able to help you).

Freddie Parker Westerfield, Polyglot

* Research done by medical physiologist Yujiro Yamanaka of Hokkaido University in Sapporo and Japanese researchers Hidemasa Motoshima and Kenji Uchida  published in the journal Neuropsychopharmacology, Twitter: “Beware of evening stress.”

https://www.technochops.com/beware-of-evening-stress-heres-why/13193/

Taboos & Intestines

When we were growing up sex was taboo topic #1.  Our intestinal track, and what went in and came out was perhaps #2.  You or someone you know probably has IBS . . . it is rarely talked about or shared.  That’s beginning to change as research increasingly is showing the importance of our microbiome and has dubbed the “gut” as our second brain.

Signals generated by the brain can influence the composition of microbes residing in the intestine and that the chemicals in the gut can shape the human brain’s structure.

Researchers at UCLA have revealed two key findings for people about the relationship between the microorganisms that live in the gut and the brain:

1.   For people with IBS, research shows for the first time that there is an association between the gut microbiota and the brain regions involved in the processing of sensory information from their bodies.

2.  The researchers gained insight into the connections among childhood trauma, brain development and the composition of the gut microbiome.

METHOD

“The UCLA researchers collected behavioral and clinical measures, stool samples and structural brain images from 29 adults diagnosed with IBS, and 23 healthy control subjects. They used DNA sequencing and various mathematical approaches to quantify composition, abundance and diversity of the gut microbiota. They also estimated the microbial gene content and gene products of the stool samples. Then the researchers cross-referenced these gut microbial measures with structural features of the brain.”

Based on the composition of the microbes in the gut, the samples from those diagnosed with IBS clustered into two subgroups:

  • One group was indistinguishable from the healthy control subjects, while the other differed.
  • Those in the group with an altered gut microbiota had more history of early life trauma and longer duration of IBS symptoms.
  • The two groups also displayed differences in brain structure.

IMPACT

“Analysis of a person’s gut microbiota may become a routine screening test for people with IBS in clinical practice, and in the future, therapies such as certain diets and probiotics may become personalized based on an individual’s gut microbial profile. At the same time, subgroups of people with IBS distinguished by brain and microbial signatures may show different responsiveness to brain-directed therapies such as mindfulness-based stress reduction, cognitive behavioral therapy and targeted drugs.

“A history of early life trauma has been shown to be associated with structural and functional brain changes and to alter gut microbial composition. It is possible that the signals the gut and its microbes get from the brain of an individual with a history of childhood trauma may lead to lifelong changes in the gut microbiome. These alterations in the gut microbiota may feed back into sensory brain regions, altering the sensitivity to gut stimuli, a hallmark of people with IBS.”

http://neurosciencenews.com/ibs-microbiota-brain-structure-6611/

“Being on the same wavelength” isn’t just a figure of speech but proven neuroscience

A study on brain-to-brain synchrony, published in Current Biology examined the neuroscience of classroom interaction and found that shared attention—spurred by certain stimuli, like eye contact and face-to-face exchange—generated similar brain wave patterns in students.*

“The human brain has evolved for group living, yet we know so little about how it supports dynamic group interactions,” the study notes. Real-world social exchanges are a mystery and much previous research has been limited to artificial environments and simple tests. This effort, however, measured brainwave activity during face-to-face interaction in a natural rather than constructed environment, investigating social dynamics across time.”

“Classrooms make a particularly good place for neuro-scientific exploration because they’re lively—with lots of actors and factors at play—but also semi-controlled environments with limited influences and all activities led by a single teacher. “This allowed us to measure brain activity and behavior in a systematic fashion over the course of a full semester as students engaged,” the researchers explain.”

“The brainwaves of 12 teenage students’ brainwaves were recorded during 11 different classes throughout the semester; each session was 50 minutes long. The students followed live lectures, watched instructional videos, and participated in group discussions. Researchers tracked students’ brainwaves throughout using portable electroencephalogram (EEG) systems.”

“I support using teenagers for research subjects”

“The study tested the hypothesis that group members think similarly, and that the more engaged they are, the more similarly the think—and that this could be seen in shared brainwave patterns. The researchers believed that engagement predicts, and possibly underpins, classroom learning specifically and group dynamics generally. Indeed, they found that when students were more engaged in a teaching style—listening to a lecture versus watching a video, say—they were also more likely to show similar brainwaves.”

“That brainwave synchronicity seems to be generated from a number of small, individual interactions. Particular types of exchanges seemed to especially influence the meeting of the minds in the study, say the researchers. For example, eye contact was linked to shared intentions, which “sets up a scaffold” for social cognition and more engagement. These individual interactions seemed to lead to a shared sense of purpose across the group—which manifested in specific brainwave patterns, likewise shared across the group.”

The researchers believe their work with teens in the classroom—which wasn’t easy given the students’ energy levels and EEGs attached to their boisterous young brains—shows it is possible to investigate the neuroscience of group interactions under “ecologically natural circumstances.” They hope it leads to more exploration of brainwaves out in the wilderness that is civilization.

*The research, led by psychologist Suzanne Dikker at New York University

https://qz.com/975137/being-on-the-same-wavelength-isnt-just-a-figure-of-speech-its-proven-neuroscience/

6 ways to Meditate for People Who Can’t “Meditate”

Yay. Sure. 100%.  When I meditate it’s 50%-50% at best.  My monkey mind swings from trees with great abandon, my thoughts rambling, rumbling and wildly roaming.

So!  Why meditate?

Meditation has been rigorously scientifically studied and it’s shown to literally change the brain.  A regular meditation practice helps significantly with depression and anxiety, meditation has been shown to help with anti-aging, fighting infections, contributing to a sense of control and combating feelings of loneliness.

Nearly anything can be turned into a meditative practice as long as you focus on leaving your “head” and experience the world through your senses. (Sorry – Television, video games and reading don’t count as meditation because they simply replace our own thoughts with more stimulating ones.)

When the stress, thinking of “doing nothing” for 20 minutes, negates  benefits here’s 6 alternative forms of meditation

(I’ve tried five of them- and they work.  You can guess which one I’ve ignored)

1.  Take a Musical Bath

Like a warm bath, sink into the melodies, soak in the harmonies, bath your body in the rhythms and Immerse yourself in sound.  It is a powerful and enjoyable form of meditation.
Get an album you’ve wanted to listen to for some time and listen to it… really listen, with no interruptions

2. Dance When NO ONE Watches

Dancing is the natural progression from listening to music.  Many of us have had the horrible feeling of dancing while being stuck in self-conscious over thinking and paranoid about how we look.

Meditative dance is ignoring everything that is going on outside our own body and becoming one with the music.  Flay your arms, sway your hips, roll your eyes –  Let go of protecting your self image, have fun and even be silly. 

3. Draw with your eyes

Drawing is less about talent and more about learning to see.  Thinking actually can get in the way so that’s why this exercise is meditative.

(Don’t worry about what it’s going to look like, it’s the meditative process that counts not the Museum of Modern Art.)

By drawing without looking you use your sight perception to get out of your head- what you THINK it should look like – and be in the moment

  1. Choose what to draw — a cup, your foot, a chair, it doesn’t matter,
  2. Set a timer for 10 or 20 minutes.
  3. Arrange yourself so you can see the object you will be drawing without seeing the paper.  Put your pencil through a paper plate so you can’t see your paper.
  4. Focus your eyes on some part of the object and coordinate your eye moving around the outline (contours) of the object with moving your pencil to record what your eyes observe.
  5. Without looking at your hand, your paper or your pencil focus only on the shape of an object.

    Do not look down at the paper as you SLOWLY move the pencil,  concentrating on the lines, and contours of the object as you let your pencil “flow” in time with your eyes.

  6. Continue observing and recording until the timer rings

Just like any meditation practice, this exercise can be difficult at first but will become easier as you learn to shift your thinking from an analytical, labeling mode to one that is more intuitive, MEDITATIVE.

4. Yoga

Not only is yoga incredible for flexibility, balance and strength, it’s also one of the oldest forms of meditation. You combining various movements with coordinated breathing to help focus on your inner body.

Watch yoga videos on YouYube, there’s hundreds to choose from – and practice them a few times a week.

Don’t get caught up with all the bells and whistles, yoga is about feeling connected to the earth and your inner body.  (The last time I checked your feet were already touching ground.)

5. Meditative Munching

Take advantage of one of the necessities of life – food – and the fact you do it every day . . . several times a day.  

Remember, the power of meditation comes with practicing full focus.  When your mind strays return to taste, texture, temperature.   Eating in front of the TV, in the car or standing over the sink only encourages the monkeys to leap around.

Eat slowly, savor each bite – focus on the textures, flavors, aromas and the temperature. (And while you’re chewing, feel grateful for each bite of nourishment.)

6. Restore with Chores

(We’ve gone from what I consider the most enjoyable – eating – to the least)

Chores can be meditative WHEN you focus solely on what your are doing.  Your monkey mind will try and take over to keep you entertained and stimulated.

Just as in all meditative practices keep refocusing your monkey mind on the task at hand: Washing dishes – focus on the temperature of water, seeing the pot become cleaner and cleaner;  Mowing the lawn – examine the cutting patterns, inhale the aroma of cut grass; Making the bed – notice the feel, color, wrinkles of sheets, the tension of folds, your hand motion . . .

(Personally, I’d rather monkey around.)

jw

https://www.lifehack.org/articles/lifestyle/6-alternative-forms-meditation-for-people-who-hate-doing-nothing.html

“Being in the dark” has benefits

Randy Nelson, who chairs the Department of Neuroscience in the West Virginia University School of Medicine, is exploring how maintaining a truly dark sleeping environment may make it easier to keep weight off.

 

“Being exposed to light at night changes how the “clock” genes that regulate our biological rhythms are expressed. Normally, encountering light upon waking in the morning synchronizes our internal body clock. “Think of it like an old-fashioned watch that gains 15 minutes every day. The way that it could still work as a good 24-hour clock is if you set this watch back 15 minutes whenever you wake up,” said Nelson, who directs basic science research for the WVU Rockefeller Neuroscience Institute.”

“But exposure to light at night can “hijack these clockworks,” he said, and the effects can be surprising. He and his colleagues have found that being exposed to light at night-even if it’s as dim as a nightlight-correlates to weight gain in animal models. Instead of confining their eating to the usual time of day, the animals ate around the clock, and they weighed more than their counterparts that experienced typical bright days and dark nights.”

“Nighttime light does more than disturb regular eating patterns. It also interferes with metabolic processes. “It’s well established that the feeding cycles are phase-locked-to use an engineering term-to the circadian cues,” said Nelson. “If you’re a day-active creature, like most of us, then we eat during the day. That’s when our metabolism is set up to process food, when our insulin starts going up, when we’re ready to deal with calories coming in.” Calories we take in at night don’t benefit from these favorable metabolic conditions. Our bodies don’t process them as much, and they tend to get stored as fat.”

https://www.herald-dispatch.com/news/wvu-neuroscientist-explores-fighting-weight-gain-with-darkness/article_1f3fea97-0426-5c45-b023-02ad6b7c7b37.html